Britain’s first subsea-to-shore gas Field

A pipe-laying vessel in the port of Rotterdam, Netherlands
Nicholas Newman Petroleum Review August 2017

Lying 125 kilometres west of the Shetland Islands are the Laggan-Tormore gas fields, an export pipeline, and a newly constructed gas-processing plant all constructed and installed in a climate similar to Southern Alaska. Total’s £3.5billion Laggan-Tormore gas development was Britain’s second largest construction project, after London’s Crossrail, which is due for completion in 2019.

The development has three distinct components: two deep offshore gas fields with a semi-autonomous production system lying on the seabed connected by a   143 km subsea export pipeline, known as the Laggan Tormore Export Pipeline (LTEP). This LTEP links the gas fields with the new £800 million Shetland Gas Plant situated on Shetland next to the Sullom Voe oil and Gas Terminal. The Gas Plant is able to process 500 million cubic feet a day – enough gas to supply two million households or about 8 percent of the UK’s energy needs. After processing, the gas is piped through a second  243 km newly constructed pipeline which connects with the Frigg-UK pipeline and then into the UK’s gas pipeline network in Scotland. Details of the development can be seen in Tables 1, 2, Figures 1 and 2.

Table 1 Project details

Ownership: Total E&P UK (60%), SSE E&P UK (20%) and Dong E&P (UK) (20%)
Operator: Total E&P
Location of fields: Laggan lies in Block 206/1a and is just 16 km from Tormore in Block 205/5a, at a water depth of 600m (1,968ft)
Distance from shore: Laggan-Tormore lies 125 km north West off the Shetland Isle
Size:  Total field reserves estimated at 1 tcf and condensates ( about 230 million barrels of oil equivalent
Cost: £3.5 billion
Length: The entire pipeline network measures approximately 386km

Source Total 2017 and BBC 2017

To read more see page 32 170660 Energy Pet Rev August P32-33

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