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Engineering students using an innovative 3d printer in the laboratory

Here are a few examples of my recent energy journalism, copywriting and other corporate communication work, which I have completed for various clients during the month of February 2017.

Pipeline and Gas Journal

The Nigeria-to-Morocco Gas Pipeline: a political pipedream?

In December 2016, the King of Morocco and Nigeria’s government agreed to initiate a proposal for a new regional gas pipeline, to be called the Trans African Pipeline (TAP). Estimates of cost, the route, its specifications and even its likely start date are yet unknown but an earlier proposal. However, a similar project, in 1970, for the Trans-Saharan Gas Pipeline (TSGP), connecting Nigeria with Algeria export terminals by 4,300 kilometers of pipe crossing the Saharan desert with a capacity of 30 billion cubic meters a year at an estimated cost of $30 billion is indicative. The current proposal is likely to have a similar capacity, be around 4,000 kilometers long and at least as expensive and is expected to be jointly funded by the Nigerian Sovereign Investment Authority and Ithmar Capital, Morocco’s sovereign wealth fund.

Oxfordprospect

10 Energy Predictions for 2030

Nic’s round-up of forecasts on global energy.  The big theme of coming years will be the growth in smaller scale energy projects and new entrants.

Growth in  renewables: the wind  and solar power

The Global Wind Energy Council forecasts that wind power could generate 2,110 GW and supply about 20 % of global electricity by 2030.

 

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IRENA forecasts that the solar will grow from supplying  2% of today’s global electricity to at least 13% by 2030.  A basket of forecasts suggests that by 2050, solar will be the largest source of electricity in the world shared by solar photovoltaics and concentrated solar power contributing 16 and 11 percent, respectively.

Much of the significant growth in solar will be in emerging economies such as India and South Africa to satisfy their extensive rural electrification programs as falling costs, rising productivity, and new storage technologies favor.

Eniday

Where there is waste there is energy

Around the world, growing cities and towns are having problems with the rubbish and sewage they collect. In the past, the solution was to dump such refuse in large holes in the ground, whilst in the case of sewage after treatment to dump the resultant effluent into nearby rivers and lakes.

Today, things are changing, in part due to tighter environmental controls, waste authorities are looking are new solutions at tackling their waste problems and at the same time, reducing operating costs.

Norway’s oil wealth swamps innovation

Norwegians like the idea of creativity but fear disruption. Its 5.2m citizens are among the world’s comfiest, with gross domestic product per head of $75,000. Its oil-funded sovereign wealth fund, set up in 1990 to help it avoid “Dutch disease” — the syndrome of resource wealth driving up national currencies and weakening other sectors — is worth $880bn. Its oil and gas reserves should last for another half-century.

Daily Telegraph E.on project

Payment options for heavy energy users.

For the large business energy users, such as manufacturers, hospitals, airports and nationwide retailers, reaching a decision about the best power-purchase option and payment method can be a complex process.  Different types of business use different amounts of energy and in different ways. Some businesses, such as Cumbria-based BSW Timber Group, rely on large quantities of power supplied throughout the day to keep its seven UK sawmilling operations running which costs it between £4 million and £ 4.5 million a year.   Another of Eon’s large power users, Merseyside’s ACC Liverpool, comprising the 11,000 capacity Echo Arena, the award-winning BT Convention Centre, as well as the new Exhibition Centre Liverpool, has highly variable power needs depending upon a schedule of activities throughout the week and into the evenings.

Payment options for heavy energy users.

For the large business energy users, such as manufacturers, hospitals, airports and nationwide retailers, reaching a decision about the best power-purchase option and payment method can be a complex process.  Different types of business use different amounts of energy and in different ways. Some businesses, such as Cumbria-based BSW Timber Group, rely on large quantities of power supplied throughout the day to keep its seven UK sawmilling operations running which costs it between £4 million and £ 4.5 million a year.   Another of Eon’s large power users, Merseyside’s ACC Liverpool, comprising the 11,000 capacity Echo Arena, the award-winning BT Convention Centre, as well as the new Exhibition Centre Liverpool, has highly variable power needs depending upon a schedule of activities throughout the week and into the evenings.

Corporate Journalism

Quatre Ltd

  1. Creation of three press releases focused on the Alberta, South African and Australian markets.
  2. Moreover, distribution of press releases to media in targets markets.
  3. The arrangement of interviews with equity magazines etc.

Undisclosed Client

Product management, development, and delivery of the tender document.

 
 
 

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