Month: April 2018

One Mission: How Leaders Build A Team Of Teams

One Mission, How Leaders Build a Team of Teams

Nicholas Newman reviews a book by  Chris Fussell and C.W. Goodyear Portfolio, New York, 2017, 304 pages   One Mission: How Leaders Build a Team of Teams is a follow-up to the book Team of Teams. Chris Fussell and C. W. Goodyear claim it is a book about how to […]

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Malta FLNG at Delimara

Powering up the Mediterranean LNG Market

The introduction of strict new European Union emission legislation is encouraging small Mediterranean island communities to invest in new power plants to accommodate liquefied natural gas (LNG) and other alternative fuels. This feature examines plans by five islands with markedly  small populations to switch to LNG for gas-to-power projects, ship […]

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Areas of German L Gas pipeline networks due for conversion to H gas

The Great German Gas Switch-Over

Germany is at the beginning of a 7 billion euro gas infrastructure project to switch 30% of its gas customers from low-calorie Group L to  high calorie Group H natural gas.  For technical reasons, and under weights-and-measures regulations, the two gas qualities have to be transported in separate systems within defined ranges, and customers cannot switch […]

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https://image.slidesharecdn.com/copenhagenfutureofeugasregulation1213oct2016-161012102425/95/eu-gas-regulation-update-7-638.jpg?cb=1476267919

EU Gas Trading in Transition

 Gas imports of 345 Bcm valued at 17 billion euros were traded across Europe during the first nine months of 2017. Russia remained the E.U.’s top supplier of natural gas, increasing its market share to 44%, followed by Norway at 33%. A new trend is the rise in LNG (Liquid […]

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A nacelle being loaded onto a ro/ro ferry. A nacelle /nəˈsɛl/ is a cover housing that houses all of the generating components in a wind turbine, including the generator, gearbox, drive train, and brake assembly.

Why Adaptation Is the New Reality for Offshore Wind Energy Logistics

Everything about the wind energy business is getting bigger. For example, current turbines averaging 4.1 MW with a hub height of 90 meters will soon be replaced by 11-MW giants with hubs 125 meters off sea level and blades spanning 190 meters. Their blade tips will cut the air at well over […]

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